A Travellerspoint blog

Sawadee Thailand!

Last stop, Phuket!

sunny 30 °C

Phuket was our last stop in Thailand. I’m glad we only stayed two nights in Patong, as Phuket didn’t feel especially Thai, and certainly the most westernized spot we had visited in the country. Good shopping, great international food options, tons of tourists and a fun spot for partying, but that’s about it. We stayed here as we needed to fly out of Phuket to Malaysia, but we wouldn’t really recommend Patong. Although we heard there are some nicer spots elsewhere on Phuket island.
IMG_2317.jpgIMG_2319.jpgIMG_2320.jpgIMG_2328.jpgIMG_2409.jpgIMG_2343.jpg

We stayed at The Nap Hotel near Patong Beach. The hotel was really great, very new andclean (aside from a few teensy tiny ants in our room, but they sorted us out, and it is kind of unavoidable in Thailand). We passed a lot of mediocre hotels on our way to Patong from the Phuket airport, so were pleased with our choice. Here are a few photos:
IMG_2365.jpgIMG_2360.jpgIMG_2358.jpgIMG_2361.jpgIMG_2352.jpg2IMG_2325.jpg8IMG_2326.jpgIMG_2412.jpg

One of the nicer spots in Patong is Patong Beach. We strolled through one afternoon. It is pretty long and once again, massages on the beach are always an option!
IMG_2379.jpgIMG_2373.jpgIMG_2376.jpgIMG_2370.jpg

Along the beach, and all over Thailand during our visit, we saw many enlarged portraits of their Queen, Queen Sirikit, such as this one.
IMG_2381.jpg
As the Queen is also regarded as mother to all Thai people, her birthday is also celebrated as ‘Mother’s Day' on 12th August every year since 1976 (the King’s birthday is Father’s Day, too). For this occasion, people all around the country raise national flags and houses are decorate with the portrait of Her Majesty the Queen. This is their way of expressing their loyalty and honor to her. Following the Thai tradition, kids kneel down before their mother to show their love and gratitude. They present her with white jasmine flowers or garlands, in return, mother shower her blessings on kids. On this day, white jasmine flowers are a common sight in Thailand as they are the symbol of maternal love.

We used our time in Patong to get organized for our the next leg of our adventure. We stocked up on some baby items at their big grocery store, Big C.The local tour booking agency near our hotel also did laundry very cheap, so we had some washing done. The lady who owned the agency wasn’t in when we came by, so the man who owned the shop next door told us to just leave our clothes outside the door and he would tell her what we wanted. We crossed our fingers and luckily all was washed and folded by the next day. 7 kgs of clothes for about 5 GBP! Here's Naim picking up the washing!
IMG_2410.jpg

I got beautified and had my eyebrows done in one of the hundreds of beauty salons and massage parlours around town, and Zavian reviewed a list of treatments he was considering.
IMG_2387.jpgIMG_2384.jpg

Check us out indulging in some authentic Thai experiences before departing:
Sushi!
IMG_2403.jpg

Hanging out with Alien and Predator!
IMG_2397.jpgIMG_2398.jpg

Having a kebab!
IMG_2404.jpg

Hee hee!

We packed our bags and prepared for our next spot, Kuala Lumpur. But not without saying the traditional greeting of Sawadee! See our friend Ronnie doing the greeting here.
IMG_2405.jpg
We heard this greeting (insert info on meaning, etc,) throughout our trip, always accompanied by a warm smile. Sawadee is a polite hello or goodbye, and is followed by "khrap/krup" for men, and "kha" for women (Zavian often got that! ha). You do not shake hands but make a "wai". Both hands are put together as if in prayer. As higher the hands are hold, as higher is the social position of the person greeted. The wai originated from an ancient greeting that was done to show neither individual had any weapons.

Thailand was a fascinating country, and we will always remember our time here and look forward to exploring it more again. In the meantime, thank you and sawadeeeeee!

Posted by jknazef 10:37 Archived in Thailand Tagged phuket patong

Email this entryFacebookStumbleUpon

Table of contents

Be the first to comment on this entry.

Comments on this blog entry are now closed to non-Travellerspoint members. You can still leave a comment if you are a member of Travellerspoint.

Login